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5
Key aspects of Ruter’s service development

5.1

Key aspects of Ruter’s service development

The strategy for the mobility of tomorrow is to develop a dense network to reach new areas of the region, so that more people find public transport to be an attractive way to travel. Customers should have more travel options through the development of a coordinated and integrated mobility service that includes walking, cycling and car sharing.

Seamless green mobility

The development of the Ruter network should make it easier and faster for customers to travel in an environmentally friendly manner on increasing numbers of journeys and for more and more journey purposes.

Punctual and fast journeys

Journey times are markedly shorter. The most important reason being higher frequencies in the metro and tram network and on much of the bus and boat lines, in line with the principles for network frequency, where ten-minute services are desirable as a minimum to ensure that wait times are competitive. In inner Oslo there may be a basis for five-minute services on many lines, while for regional buses a 30-minute service will often provide a good balance between quality and cost.

Significantly better priority to ensure unhindered  flow for buss and trams on streets and roads, a larger share of rail-based traffic in dedicated lanes and an upgraded and reliable infrastructure contribute to faster journeys. Furthermore, improved reliability means that the consequences of delays are significantly reduced, and normally customers no longer need to leave on an earlier departure in order to be sure to make important meetings and transfers.

There are fewer delays and they are handled in a coordinated manner. Customers receive useful messages about alternative itineraries when delays nevertheless arise. The resources are quickly reallocated at a delay coordination centre, and all signage and other information has a standard that enables customers to easily find their way.

Green streets

Street use in inner Oslo and in the regional cities has changed so that streetscapes have a new character. Parking has been moved to dedicated facilities. The freed street space has opened up for broader pavements, more trees, and more space for street life, pedestrians, cyclists, goods delivery, stops for getting on and off, and not least the securing of navigability for trams and buses where relevant.

Car ownership is unnecessary in inner Oslo

Today, half of the households in inner Oslo do not have a car. Cars are used for only 18 per cent of journeys. In 2030, the public green mobility service will be so well developed that only a few of the increasing numbers of people choosing to live inside Ring 3, including Hovinbyen, own a car. New direct connections and higher frequencies in the public transport network, access to cars and bicycles through Ruter and more accurate costs for residential parking, all contribute to this.

In sparsely populated areas of the region, the car will still play an important role. Mobility for all is ensured through minimum weekly offerings of transport-on-demand services.

5.1 From strategy to services

SageneHovinbyenFornebuMossAskerDrammenLillestrømSkiDrøbakÅrnesNeskollenMajorstuenInner OsloOuter OsloVillages and sparsely populated aresRegional cities and townsCharacteristics Immediate proximity between housing, workplaces and all servicesMobility services Cyclists and pedestrians are prioritized and represent a significant share of the person traffic At least five-minute frequency for public transport Limited facilitation for carsAmbitions Halve car use for service, visits and leisure journeys from today's level Unproblematic to live without a car, because public transport, bicycling and walking is fast, reliable and flexibleCharacteristics Proximity between housing, several workplaces and all servicesMobility services Metro and train form the backbone At least ten-minute frequency for public transport Bicycling and walking central for all journeys Car-sharing initiatives* are usefulAmbitions Reduce the car share equivalent to what it is in the inner city today. Halve car use for service, visits and leasure journeys from today's level Unproblematic to live without a car, because public transport, bicycling and walking is fast, reliable and flexibleCharacteristics Proximity between housing, several workplaces and all servicesMobility services Regional train and city bus network form the backbone Typically ten-minute frequency Bicycling and walking central for leausure journeys locally Car sharing initiatives* are usefulAmbitions Reduce car share equivalent to what it is in outer Oslo today Those who wish can easily live without their own car in the regional citiesCharacteristics Not walking or biking-distances to work or services for the majority of the populationMobility services Park-and-ride and feeding by bus to regional trains and to improve the service to commuters Typically half-hour frequency Bicycling and walking works for leisure journeys locally The car is a necessity for some journeysAmbitions Journeys to work in city areas by public transport should be the preferred travel mode The private car does not need to be the only travel alternative*By car-sharing initiatives we mean all car-sharing solutions, inclucing car pooling, private car-sharing collectives, commercial short-term car rental services, and so on.POPULATION DENSITY/AREA UTILIZATION
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Expanded rail-based network ties the region closer together

The Concept Study Oslo Hub from 2015 is followed up by a targeted investment in a regional network that has the local, and completely dominant, transport needs at its centre. A new metro tunnel provides increased frequency and capacity on all branch lines and new stations in the centre. New railway tunnels strengthen the train service nationally, regionally and locally. The old double tracks between Asker, Ski and Lillestrøm are linked in a system with a new and enhanced local train service in inner Oslo.

The train and metro interact with the light rail, tram, bus and boat in a network tied together in strengthened and, to some extent, newly developed transport hubs. Oslo S is further developed into a shared, central hub for the train, metro, tram, city buses, regional buses and national buses.

Among new tram lines, the east-west connection along Ring 2 Skøyen-Bryn and north-south in Uelands gate towards Sagene and Bjølsen are important parts of a high-frequency core network in inner Oslo. The transfer options at transport hubs such as Skøyen, Majorstuen, Sagene and Bryn have expanded significantly.

The regional cities are strengthened as green transport hubs

In the regional cities, green mobility is facilitated through electric, biogas and biodiesel buses, and possibly light rail, walking and cycling, in a manner that links the regional cities’ city-centre functions with the stations. Reliable correspondence and safe, quick and comfortable transfers are secured.

5.2

Different strategies for different areas

The capital region is not a homogeneous area, but consists of urban areas, mid-sized regional cities, smaller station towns, and villages and agricultural areas that are sparsely populated. The areas have different conditions for walking, cycling and public transport, and the answer to what the right service might be is not the same everywhere.

The region can be roughly divided into four types of areas: Inner Oslo; outer Oslo; regional cities and towns; and villages and sparsely populated areas.

The approach to and ambitions for the mobility solutions in the different areas vary, but as highlighted in chapter 3, Markets and opportunities, Ruter’s strategy is based on the region gradually becoming denser and more urban. We get a sort of spillover effect, where land use and travel habits in inner Oslo spread to outer Oslo. Correspondingly, land use and travel habits spread from inner Oslo to the regional cities in Akershus, and smaller towns are also expected to increase in density and urbanisation.

In line with the expected and desired land use development, where cities are developed organically, Ruter’s strategy means that the mobility solutions both support and possibly hasten this development. This entails a gradual increase in the network frequency in all areas, and that areas with high network frequencies expand. To achieve this, the more inflexible systems for rail-based traffic must be supplemented by an increasingly dense and flexible network of buses, minibuses, car-sharing services, cycling paths, and walking paths.

5.2 Market-oriented service development
Sandvika Nesodd- tangen Kolbotn Fornebu Lillestrøm renskog Jessheim Årnes OSL Gardermoen Asker Drammen Drøbak Nittedal Sørumsand Hønefoss Ski Ås Oslo S 5 minutes The entire city area inside Ring 3 10 minutes The entire urban corridor within Asker, Lillestrøm, Ås, as well as Jessheim-Gardermoen 30 minutes Lines from outside the urban corridor directed towards the city centre
Schematic diagram of service development
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5.3

The public transport service of the future

The description of the public transport service is divided into four market areas: central Oslo, south, northeast and west. We provide a general description of the future public transport service for each of these areas.

Within each area, we have chosen three places where we describe how the mobility service should look in 2030/2040. In total, ten places in Oslo and Akershus are described (Majorstuen, Sagene, Hovinbyen, Ski, Drøbak, Kjeller, Årnes, Neskollen, Fornebu and Asker), and two places outside of Ruter’s area (Drammen and Moss). Drammen and Moss are included because Ruter’s services are important for their residents and because Ruter works closely with both Østfold and Buskerud on the development of seamless services across county boundaries. In addition to describing the concrete services for these places, the service description also provides a picture of how the services should look in cities and towns in other areas of Oslo and Akershus.

5.4

The development of transport services in central Oslo

The most extensive public transport service can be found in central Oslo. Majorstuen, Sagene and Hovinbyen are highlighted as examples of how urban development with intensive land use in walking distance of public transport hubs supports public transport. Corresponding urban development is appropriate near several public transport hubs in the city.

 New lines provide new travel options

Ruter’s services respond to  an urbanisation trend tied to an urban development aimed at green mobility. This takes place through a significant improvement of rail-based services in central Oslo, generally speaking inside of Ring 3, plus Hovinbyen. The most important measures are improving the design of the comprehensive network, created through the coordination of public transport, bicycle and car rental, a new metro tunnel, a new north-south railway tunnel, and modern tram with light rail characteristics along Ring 2.

Areas outside of reasonable walking distance of the metro, tram or local train will in all parts of the city have a high-frequency service by electricly powered local buses, which in time will be partially or fully automated. At the same time, city bikes will be an easily available alternative.

High frequency and prioritised access

Street parking removed in favour of urban life and prioritised access for trams, buses, and bicycles contribute to faster and safer journeys.

In time, five-minute routes are established as a minimum standard for most parts of the operational day. This means minimal wait times and consequences of delays, and not least that transfers at the highly adapted transport hubs can be made without much time loss. Street parking removed in favour of urban life and prioritised access for trams, buses, and bicycles contribute to faster and safer journeys.

Oslo city centre: Urban life with walking, cycling and trams at the surface, and the metro and train in tunnels

In the streets of central Oslo inside Ring 1, adaptations are made for safe walking and cycling. New metro and railway tunnels transfer a larger share of public transport services to metro and local trains, while the surface service is provided by trams. In particular, the tram service in the central streets service Lilleaker, Rikshospitalet, Sagene, Bjølsen, Torshov, Kjelsås, Bjerke, Tonsenhagen and Ekeberg. Other areas are also served, to provide a comprehensive network. Several of today’s direct bus lines to and from the city centre have been replaced by frequent feeder buses to the rail-based stations.

Skøyen-Frogner-Majorstuen: New stations/traffic centres and tram in Bygdøy allé

The Fornebu Line has frequent departures and provides a very fast connection between the transport hubs and the neighbourhood centres at Skøyen and Majorstuen. In both places, new public transport centres will provide new travel options with transfers between trains, metro, trams and buses and with bicycle and car rental services.

Bygdøy allé may get a high-frequency, modern tram service towards the city centre, Majorstuen and Skøyen, if a more detailed study concludes that this should be built. Bus traffic will be redirected, away from Bygdøy allé, while Drammensveien and Frognerveien at the same time will become tram-free. The reorganisation of the transport service from bus to rail-based means of transport relieves the streets of regional and city buses, but most importantly the attractiveness of public transport will contribute much to reducing car traffic in the area. Regional buses to Oslo feed trains, the metro and trams at Skøyen, the metro and trains at Lysaker and the trains in Sandvika or Asker.

After 2030, Frogner/Elisenberg may get a local train station, preferably linked to options for transfer to trams in Bygdøy allé.

Bislett-St. Hanshaugen: Local train service

A new northerly local train tunnel with a station at Bislett contributes to making this neighbourhood more easily accessible from central parts of Oslo, such as Ullevål/Sagene, Sinsen and Økern, and areas along the Østfold Line and the Main Line. Local trains will depart every ten minutes, increasing to every five minutes. With a new metro tunnel routed via Bislett, the hub function and travel options will be strengthened further. In the metro tunnel, departures may be as frequent as every one and a half minutes. Bislett will become a central hub in an enhanced transversal connection, in principle like the line for the current bus line 21 between Aker brygge and Helsfyr via Alexander Kiellands plass and Bislett.

Grünerløkka-Sagene: Central to a new rail-based network

The urban rail-based network that Ruter considers key to succeeding in reaching our goal for urban and traffic developments will affect all of inner Oslo, and particularly Ullevål/Sagene and Lower Grünerløkka as well as Bislett. A new metro stop at Schous plass/Nybrua, with departures as often as every other minute, will provide good accessibility not just to the city centre but to a much larger area of Oslo than current services provide. Ullevål/Sagene/Lovisenberg can become a hub connecting local trains, a new tram line with light rail characteristics along Ring 2 and a modern urban tram between the city centre and Bjølsen/Nydalen via Uelands gate and Alexander Kiellands plass. The tram service will at minimum have departures every five minutes.

Bryn-Hovinbyen-Sinsen:  East-west light rail

Next to Oslo S, Bryn will be the most accessible public transport centre in the region, with regional trains, local trains, the metro, tram, city buses and a regional bus terminal. A tram with light rail characteristics will provide high-frequency internal connections in Hovinbyen and make it possible to get to the Bryn and Økern/Sinsen public transport centres quickly. Along Ring 3, direct regional bus connections via transport hubs/public transport centres such as Bryn, Økern, Sinsen and Skøyen will be provided in addition to city buses.

Gamle Oslo: Tram service at Vålerenga

The trams in Dronning Eufemias gate provide connections towards Ekeberg and Hauketo and towards Vålerenga, Helsfyr and Bryn. The regional bus traffic that previously passed through the area now terminate at Bryn or other public transport centres.

Skøyen Lysaker Sandvika Asker Ski Lillestrøm Økern Bryn Nydalen Storo Majorstuen Jar Regional train Local train Metro Tram and main city lines Regional hub Local hub 5’ 5’ 5’ 5’ 5’ 5’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 5’ 10’ 5’ 5’ 5’ 5’ 5’ 5’ 10’ 10’ 5’ Hauketo 5’ 10’ Sinsen Veitvet/Linderud Nationaltheatret Stortinget Oslo S Sagene Nybrua Forskningsparken Tøyen Carl B. pl. Bislett Ullevål s.. Torshov
5.3 Schematic diagram for the development of transport services for the main lines in central Oslo
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Majorstuen – previously a chaotic intersection, now a hub with a vibrant street life

Valkyrien stasjon Majorstuen
5.4 Illustration: Vision for Valkyrie plass with entrance to the new Majorstuen station, located underground >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

Majorstuen is an urban area with residential density, many workplaces and well-developed services – and with everything within walking or cycling distance for most people. Majorstuen will increasingly become an even more central hub for public transport, with more frequent departures and more travel options, including the Fornebu Line and a tram along Ring 2.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • High-capacity underground modes of transport
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Increased capacity on the current metro network (at least every 5 min.)
    Fornebu Line (6 min.)
  • New tram line along Ring 2 in addition to the existing tram network (5 min.)
  • Significantly upgraded station with significantly increased capacity
  • Buses using renewable energy provide geographic coverage (5/10 min.)
Cycling and walking
  • Cycling and walking are crucial for short distances
  • Good walking and cycling paths and a city bike scheme
Car and car sharing
  • Limited facilitation for private car ownership
  • Car-sharing services cover needs for cars; and car ownership is unnecessary

Sagene – a good place to live without a car

5.5 Illustration: Local train station and modern trams at Arkitekt Rivertz’ plass at Sagene >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

With a high population density, most necessary services within walking or cycling distance and good connections to the city centre, Sagene is well suited for a life without a private car. The planned rail-based services will provide more flexibility and contribute to seamless travel options in all directions. Buses running on renewable energy will provide the necessary geographic coverage.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • High-capacity tram north-south and east-west
  • Local trains underground
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Sagene becomes a central hub
  • New tram along Ring 2 and from the city centre to Sagene via Nydalen (5 min.)
  • Local trains through the city centre (10 min.)
  • Buses using renewable energy provide geographic coverage (5/10 min.)
Cycling and walking
  • Cycling and walking remain central mobility modes in 2030
  • Good walking and cycling paths and city bike schemes
Car and car sharing
  • Limited facilitation for private car ownership
  • Car-sharing services cover needs for cars; and car ownership is unnecessary in the area

Hovinbyen – the city's second centre, business capital, and hub for trains, the airport express, the metro and bicycles

Vollebekk Hovin
5.6 Illustration Hovinbyen, Vollebekk (Planning and Building Authority) >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

Hovinbyen will be a self-sufficient urban area with residences, workplaces, shops, entertainment, cafes, restaurants and services. An organic densification of urban space means that most services will be available within walking and cycling distance. A light rail with a supplementary city bus connects the area.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • High-capacity underground modes of transport provide fast connections to the city centre
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Metro towards the city centre (5 min.)
  • Local trains through the city centre (10 min.)
  • East-west light rail (10 min.)
  • Buses using renewable energy provide geographic coverage (5/10 min.)
  • Bryn will be a central hub
Cycling and walking
  • Good facilitation for cycling and walking through urban planning
  • Because all necessary services are nearby, cycling and walking are the most common forms of mobility
Car and car sharing
  • Limited facilitation for cars
  • Ring 3 will be routed through a tunnel
  • Car-sharing services that cover needs for cars; car ownership is unnecessary
5.5

The development of transport services in the southern area

The southern area is diverse and includes regional cities, relatively dense suburbs, areas with detached homes and townhouses, and agricultural areas. We have focused on Ski, Drøbak and Moss as examples of how we envision the development of the service. Along with Ås, Ski has been designated a regional city in the Follo region, and the new Ski- Oslo railway tunnel is expected to lead to significant urban development. Like in the other regional cities and important transport hubs in Akershus, street accessibility and priority for buses is important. Moss is included as an example of a city that is outside of Ruter's area, but that for all practical purposes is part of the functional capital region. Coordination of the services across county boundaries is crucial.

The Follo Line – a starting point for new possibilities

Once the Follo Line opens after 2022, customers will have a significantly improved train service for traffic towards Oslo, and it will also be easier to travel within Follo and the southern parts of Oslo. Through better interplay between trains and buses in the transport hubs, customers are offered more travel options and more frequent departures outside of the train corridor as well. A high-frequency local train service, which is an upgrade of the local train service on the old double tracks, provide a market-oriented increase in frequency and capacity by linking them together through new tunnels through Oslo. The Ski-Kolbotn-Oslo S-Nationaltheatret segment is linked to the Main Line/Lillestrøm through a new tunnel towards Bislett, Økern and the Alnabru area.

Ski: Regional city that is even more accessible

Ski will have seven to eight departures per hour directly to and from Oslo S, and many onwards to Skøyen or Lysaker/Stabekk. According to NSB’s plans, local trains on the old Østfold Line will first have quarterly departures during normal traffic, extended to Lysaker/Stabekk. Later, this will be developed into high-frequency local trains with ten-minute departures. It will also become easier to travel locally and transversally. The bus lines Ski-Vinterbro,  Ski-Bøleråsen and Ski-Drøbak will have ten-minute frequencies and the plan is for correspondence at Ski with all direct trains to Oslo S. In Ski, these lines have city bus characteristics.

Ås: University town intertwined with the city of Ski

The trains between Moss and Oslo will depart every half hour. The buses towards Ski and Drøbak will run every ten minutes. Ås station can become a pilot hub for multi-modal green travel, also offered through RuterFlex.

Vestby: Seamless journeys towards Østfold as well

A new, shared ticketing and fare system for the Ruter area and Østfold means that customers encounter the same fares on trains and buses in and to and from Østfold as well, and the same ticket can be used throughout the entire area. This is significant not least for Vestby, which has links to Østfold and the Moss region, including the hospitals in Moss and Sarpsborg.Local trains at Vestby and Sonsveien stations depart every half hour. The Moss-Son-Sonsveien bus route, which crosses county boundaries, and the Brevik-Son-Sonsveien feeder bus will depart every half hour and correspond with the trains.

Frogn: Upgraded core bus service Drøbak-Oslo

The bus service between Drøbak and Oslo continues as an enhanced, high-standard bus corridor. A future shortcut between Vassum on the E6 and the Nygård intersection on the E18 along with guaranteed priority access locally to and from Ski station may change this picture and mean that better service can be provided by buses feeding to the train.

Nesodden: Half-hour departures to Aker brygge

A half-hour basic line from Aker brygge to Nesoddtangen will be introduced. To strengthen connections towards Follo, hourly buses are run from Nesoddtangen via Fagerstrand to Vinterbro.

Enebakk: The fastest way to Oslo is via Ski

A further reinforcement of the bus service in Enebakk will take place through the use of the route between Ytre Enebakk and Ski. This will shorten journey times after the Follo Line opens, and will make travel to the regional city of Ski easier.

Oppegård: Efficient local trains every ten minutes

After the Follo Line opens, the stations in Oppegård will first be able to offer quarterly departures, and later local trains every ten minutes in the direction of Oslo and Ski. In addition, extra departures will run between Kolbotn and Oslo as needed. The centre of Kolbotn will be more easily accessible. Kolbotn station will be strengthened as a hub for buses/trains and will be a new terminal for buses via Trollåsen and Tårnåsen/Sofiemyr – both with quarterly departures at first and later with ten-minute departures. A bus line between Ski and Hauketo will provide geographic coverage for areas that currently have long walking distances to public transport. At the same time, new direct travel options open up north-south outside of the railway axis. With an increased frequency and capacity on the Østfold Line, buses can terminate at Hauketo station, with transfers to trains, a number of bus lines and a future tram line.

Søndre Nordstrand: Hauketo public transport centre

The Ekeberg Line will be extended to the Hauketo hub for a better network effect in combination with trains and buses, providing for new travel options. The urban development area Gjersud/Stensrud can be served by a feeder bus to Mortensud and Hauketo, by a metro extension, by a local train branch from Hauketo, or by a further extension of the Ekeberg Line as a light rail service with a direct city centre connection, or through transfers to local trains at Hauketo.

Nordstrand: Modern light rail and frequent metro

Ruter plans further increases for the service on the Lambertseter Line from eight departures an hour after the new metro tunnel is operational. With new trams, the modernised Ekeberg Line will provide a faster and more comfortable journey than it previously offered.

Østensjø: Eight – and later ten – metro departures an hour

Frequency on the upgraded Østensjø Line will double to eight departures an hour from 2016. After the the new metro tunnel is built, an even better frequency can be offered.

Nordre Østfold: Hourly bus to Ski and Lillestrøm

In collaboration with Østfold Public Transport, a replacement service will be created for Nettbuss’ discontinued service by extending the bus between Ski and Kråkstad to Askim. Trøgstad will have an hourly route with an hourly schedule to Askim and Lillestrøm, with emphasis on corresponding in Askim with the train to and from Oslo and the bus to and from Moss.

Ski Ytre Enebakk Mortensrud Lillestrøm Skullerud Vinterbro Drøbak Ås Nesoddtangen Lysaker Fornebu Bøler Ryen Oslo S Vestby Kolbotn Lambertseter Sonsveien 30’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 10’ 5’ 5’ Fagerstrand 30’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 10’ 10’ 10’ Hauketo Vevelstad 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 5’ Akerbrygge 30’ 30’ Train Local train Metro Tram Bus Hub Boat
5.7 Expansion of transport services in the southern area
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Moss – travel with a shared ticket everywhere – short distance to Oslo, Halden, Son, Drammen and Sweden

5.8 Illustration: Vision for the future of Moss station as a vibrant and enjoyable hub
Characteristics of the area

Moss has many characteristics in common with most towns in the central areas of eastern Norway – regardless of county. With just a half hour journey to Oslo and shared information, ticketing and fare systems across county boundaries, Moss will be closely integrated in the Oslo region, while at the same time all necessary services will be more easily accessible in the centre of Moss through a high-frequency metro bus service.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • High-frequency regional train, local train and metro bus network
  • City bus network for geographic coverage
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Regional train/local train (15 min.) – Travel time to Oslo 30 min.
  • City bus network expanded to a metro bus coordinated with train departures and arrivals
  • Shared ticketing, fare and information system for buses and trains crossing county boundaries
Cycling and walking
  • A denser city means that cycling and walking are important for leisure travel and personal business in the area
  • Further expansion of walking and cycling paths
Car and car sharing
  • Various car-sharing services will be useful for many people
  • Park and rides outside of the city centre make it possible to use public transport for part of the journey for those who must use a car

Ski - offers lots of space with no need for a car, just as centrally located as many Oslo neighbourhoods

Nye Ski stasjon
5.9 Illustration: New Ski station with seamless transfers between bus, train and bicycle
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Characteristics of the area

Ski is one of six regional cities in Akershus that are to be invested in. This means increased residential development, more businesses, and thus a growth in local services. Ski will to a great extent be a «self-sufficient» regional city. To achieve this, it is important that urban development and densification takes place around and near the train station. The Ski terminal is an important element of the regional bus service. The city bus network is developed to absorb a greater share of travel for personal business and leisure in the area.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • High-frequency regional train with a city bus network for geographic coverage
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Regional train (10 min.)
  • Local train (10 min.)
  • Bus routes in/between Ski, Ås and Drøbak
  • City bus network (10 min./5 min. during rush hour)
  • Increased terminal capacity
  • More business development and workplaces reduces the need for long journeys to work
Cycling and walking
  • Cycling must absorb a greater share of travel for leisure and personal business in the area
  • Expanded walking and cycling path network
Car and car sharing
  • Limitations on cars in central city streets provide better accessibility for the buses

Drøbak – the city centre is expanding and Dyrløkke, Ullerud and Seiersten are merging

buss i Drøbak sentrum
5.10 Bus in the centre of Drøbak >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

Drøbak is a small town. The residential areas around Drøbak will merge and further growth will take place within the existing town structure. Many people who live in Drøbak work or attend school in Oslo and depend on an efficient and good public transport service to Oslo. With a new bus route between Vassum on the E6 and Nygårdskrysset on the E18, travel speed for the public transport service in Ski will improve significantly. The regional buses will be able to feed the new Follo Line.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • High-standard bus service to Ski and Oslo
  • Regional train from Ski to Oslo
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Bus routes between Drøbak, Ås and Ski (10 min. during rush hour)
  • Public transport absorbs a greater share of travel for leisure and personal business in the area
  • School buses and transport-on-demand services supplement the regional bus network
Cycling and walking
  • Cycling must absorb a greater share of travel for leisure and personal business in the area
  • Further expansion of walking and cycling paths
Car and car sharing
  • Ride-sharing and car-sharing services can be useful for many people
  • Limited facilitation for private car ownership
5.6

The development of transport services in the northeastern area

There are great variations in population density and public transport services in the northeastern area. Further densification and urbanisation within the urban corridor provide the basis for high capacity and high frequency public transport. In other parts of the area, there will not be a basis for the same comprehensive public transport service. To illustrate the breadth of the urban and regional development, we have highlighted Lillestrøm, Årnes and Neskollen as examples showing the relationship between land use and development of public transport.

The regional city of Lillestrøm will have better connections to Groruddalen and Lørenskog with Ahus hospital

Groruddalen, Lørenskog, Rælingen and Skedsmo are in the urban corridor, where the urbanisation trend is clear, densification can and should take place, and where the basis for a high-capacity and high frequency public transport service is present and is being further developed.

The development of Lillestrøm into a larger and more attractive regional city is supported by a better facilitation for cycling and a local city bus concept, by terminal and hub functions for regional buses in Romerike, and by a considerably reinforced train service. New investments in local trains, in particular through the introduction of a tunnel from the north end of Oslo, provide a ten-minute route directly to several Oslo neighbourhoods via Økern, Sinsen, Sagene and Bislett – and possibly also via Ahus hospital.

The public transport service in the area is currently being planned, through a Concept Evaluation. The alternatives include an extension of the Furuset Line, but other rail and bus solutions are also being considered. With the point of departure being a network that is to serve the entire pattern of travel in the area in the best way possible, and support the desired regional land use development and Lillestrøm as a regional city, there is much to be said for recommending the extension of the Furuset Line to the closest natural hub in Lørenskog. Ahus hospital can be served by buses or a light rail on a line between Groruddalen and Kjeller. Later, a train service may also be considered. Thus, high-frequency rail-based services will be established in this future growth area, in line with recommendations from the Planning collaboration on the development of the urban corridor Lørenskog-Strømmen-Lillestrøm-Kjeller.

Until such a time that it might be possible to provide a light rail service in Groruddalen and Lørenskog that includes transversal connections and supplements trains and metro services towards Oslo, the bus route Lillestrøm-Ahus-Lørenskog-Alnabyen-Oslo city centre will be upgraded to RuterBy with an endpoint in the west-end of the city centre. In time, five-minute departures should be provided here for large parts of the operating day.

Upgraded bus to Nittedal and Nannestad

Large parts of Nannestad and Nittedal are outside the service area of the train. Buses to Oslo from Nannestad and Nittedal will be upgraded to a high-standard bus concept. For Nittedal, this applies until the Nittedal Line is in place as part of the reorganisation of the Gjøvik Line and to better serve the market than the route through Nordmarka is able to. The terminal in Oslo will be at either Bryn or Oslo S.
Using local trains on the Nittedal Line will result in departures every ten minutes from the point where the line branches off from the Main Line at Grorud via Stovner. Such a service requires land use to utilise the significant development opportunities in parts of Nittedal that a new train route would provide.

Bryn as a terminal for regional and long-distance buses

The development of Bryn as a public transport centre for trains (including a station on the Gardemoen Line), metro, tram/light rail, city buses, regional buses and national buses – with good connections to large parts of Oslo – means that it is natural to link large parts of the public transport service in the northeastern corridor to Bryn. We are already seeing that many people choose to transfer from the bus to the metro at Helsfyr, including on buses that pass through the city centre.

Parts of Romerike fall outside the area for an urban public transport service

Meeting the zero-growth goal for car traffic must take place within a framework using natural differentiation. Significant parts of Romerike will have a basic service that entails a bus every hour, in some cases every half hour, to stations and transport hubs such as Lillestrøm, Kløfta, Jessheim, Gardermoen and Sørumsand. This applies to the central areas of the municipalities of Enebakk (Flateby), Fet, Aurskog-Høland, Sørum, Nes, Ullensaker, Eidsvoll and Hurdal. No buses from these areas generally go to and from Oslo. Outside of the central areas, a RuterFlex service will be offered as a transport-on-demand service.

The consequences of such a bus service will be that car traffic will increase to some extent in line with population growth. This will be compensated by developing services to reduce car traffic in other areas of the region.

Groruddalen will get a new rail-based service

There is great development potential in Groruddalen. Today, the road network is relatively good compared to the public transport service for journeys within the area. Ruter acknowledges that new measures must be put in place, for example a light rail that creates some transversal connections and at the same time serves as a supplement along the floor of the valley. With smaller units and an infrastructure that is less fixed than for rail and metro, light rail and super bus services can provide departures every five minutes and be incorporated into existing built-up areas without unreasonable interventions. At the same time, a possible light rail service will be able to provide connections to Lørenskog/Ahus and Lillestrøm. The development of local train services on the Main Line will in time enable departures every five minutes between Breivoll and Grorud, with every other departure via Bryn and Økern/Sagene.

An assessment will be made of whether the tram connection from Sinsen via Tonsenhagen to Linderud/Veitvet should be extended to Alnabyen and a hub with local trains.

Local buses every ten minutes

Even with a more extensive rail-based network, there will be a need for a supplementary bus network, mainly for local journeys and as feeder service to rail-based stations.These must have high frequencies, in line with the corresponding rail-based service.

Lillestrøm Fjerdingby Frogner Kløfta Årnes Ask Nannestad Skedsmokorset Olavsgaard Nittedal Grorud T Sørumsand Bjørkelangen Fetsund Furuset Ahus 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 30’ 10’ 10’ 5’ 5’ 10’ 30’ 30’ Jessheim Eidsvoll Hurdal OSL 30’ 30’ Trosterud Veitvet Stovner Gjelleråsen 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ Lørenskog St. Lørenskog Oslo S Bryn Sinsen Train Local train Metro Bus Hub
5.11 The development of transport services in the northeastern area
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Renewal of Kjeller - Lillestrøm city

Bilde av Lillestrøm stasjon Kjeller
5.12 Illustration: Vision for the future of Lillestrøm station, with a light rail/super bus in Jonas Lies gate >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

When Kjeller airport is closing, new opportunities for a unique city transformation opens up. A future super bus or light rail to Lillestrøm station, with an onwards direct route by train to Gardermoen and Oslo, creates a basis for the development of a functional and dense city. Lillestrøm will be centre of the region and an important hub for regional buses. Lillestrøm will continue to be the fastest-growing regional city and will gradually merge with Oslo.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • The Romerike Line brings you to the centre of Lillestrøm 
and Lillestrøm station quickly
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • The regional buses in the area will go to Lillestrøm
  • Super bus/light rail and trains (10 min.)
  • City buses provide geographic coverage (10 min.)
Cycling and walking
  • Cycling and walking are natural choices in the increasingly dense city of Lillestrøm, but have greater limitations for those who plan to settle in surrounding areas.
Car and car sharing
  • A young and growing population enjoys ride sharing, reasonably priced car-sharing services and new forms of transport-on-demand services.
  • There is a basis for an even better public transport service in Lillestrøm if many people choose to use a car-sharing service rather than their own car

Årnes – a small town with cycling paths

Bilde av Årnes stasjon
5.13 Illustration: Årnes in Nes municipality >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

Årnes has a less dense residential area and many people work outside of the small town. Årnes is growing organically. Schools are co-located and school transport is important for residents. More people therefore need motorised transport to get to park and rides, work, shops and services.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • School buses and feeder buses for regional trains
  • The train is the main travel mode for commuters
  • Private cars will still be central
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Regional bus lines to Lillestrøm, Jessheim and Gardermoen
  • School buses
  • Transport-on-demand
Cycling and walking
  • Cycling and walking can meet the demand for some travel for leisure and personal business, but great distances mean that these options are more difficult for travel to work or for journeys with multiple stops/purposes
Car and car sharing
  • Private cars will be a sensible mode of transport for many purposes
  • Park and rides make it possible for commuters to use public transport for parts of the journey to urban areas
  • Ride-sharing and car-sharing services can be useful for a number of people

Neskollen – a small town that succeeds due to smarter car use

Bilde av Neskollen
5.14 Illustration: Neskollen, an example of an area where the car will remain important >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

Neskollen is a typical small town in Akershus, with about 1,900 residents and a small centre with a school, mall and sport facility. Many residents work outside of the town. The residential area is centrally located but quite spread out, and many people therefore need a car to get to work, shops and services.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • School buses and feeder buses to regional trains
  • Private cars will still be central
Services in 2030/2040
  • School buses
  • Rush hour schemes
  • Transport-on-demand
  • Feeder buses to trains for commuters going towards urban area
Cycling and walking
  • Cycling and walking can contribute to some of the travel for leisure and personal business, but great distances mean that these options are more difficult for work related travel or for journeys with multiple stops/purposes
Car and car sharing
  • Private cars will be a sensible mode of transport for many purposes
  • A park and ride at Kløfta makes it possible for commuters to use public transport for parts of the journey to urban areas
  • Ride-sharing and car-sharing services can be useful for a number of people
5.7

The development of transport services in the western areas

Both the metro and the railway provide efficient and high-capacity public transport in the western area. Fornebu, Asker and Drammen are highlighted as examples of urban development and the development of public transport services. Like the other regional cities and important hubs in Akershus, priority access for buses at Fornebu and in Asker and other important transport hubs in the west to ensure reduced travel time and improve punctuality is important. Drammen is an example of a city that is outside of Ruter's area but that for all practical purposes is part of the functional capital region. Coordination of the services across county boundaries is crucial.

Train Local train Metro Tram Bus Hub Boat Jar Røa 5’ 5’ 10’ 10’ 30’ 30’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 30’ 10’ 10’ 30’ 10’ 10’ 10’ 30’ Kolsås Bærums Verk Bekkestua Lysaker Østerås Sandvika Nesoddtangen Eiksmarka Fornebu Skøyen Majorstuen Asker Blakstad Akerbrygge 30’ Heggedal Oslo S Nationaltheatret Slemmestad Vollen
5.15 The development of transport services in the western area
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The regional city of Sandvika should be developed further as a public transport centre – easily accessible for more people

Bærum and the town of Sandvika are parts of the region where there has been – and should continue to be – a clear urbanisation trend. Denser land use, combined with a high-frequency and high-capacity public transport service, is necessary to achieve the zero-growth target.The development of the railway in the Drammen/Asker-Sandvika-Oslo-Lillestrøm/Eidsvoll axis has over time provided the basis for a train service customers find even more attractive.This has entailed transfers from bus to trains, with a marked overall growth, especially in train traffic.

Sandvika’s role as a public transport centre will be strengthened by the opening of the Ringerike Line, which provides new and quick travel options and even more trains to and from Oslo. The development of an improved local train service on the old double tracks will contribute to Sandvika having an overall train service with the frequency of an urban metro service. To provide a clear network structure with good correspondence for the highest number of travel connections possible, Sandvika should have the highest priority as a long-distance train stop between Oslo S and Drammen.

Regional bus lines should to a greater extent than today terminate in Sandvika and not pass through to Oslo. This is necessary to give customers the best possible combined public transport service based on available funds and the capacities of rail, roads and terminals. The reorganisation, along with the target traffic growth, requires a high-capacity terminal, and not least fast and reliable access for buses to and from the station to provide for punctual and realiable travel.

An assessment should be made of whether some bus lines crossing county boundaries should terminate in Sandvika rather than in Oslo. For Buskerud, this is done in collaboration with Brakar. This also applies to the buses from Røyken and Hurum via Slemmestad and from Hønefoss, among others. For the Lier bus, Asker is an alternative to Sandvika. A local train service with at minimum ten-minute departures will provide an entirely different market potential than today, which will allow Ruter to aim for a high utilisation of the Slependen, Blommenholm, Høvik and Stabekk stations.

The regional city of Asker is easily accessible along the Drammen-Oslo-Gardermoen line

The train connections to and from Asker are getting better and better, with higher frequencies and short travel times along the Drammen-Asker-Sandvika-Oslo-Lillestrøm-Gardermoen line. The share of the population using public transport is high here, but public transport use is too restricted to travel to work and to a number of other purposes for traffic towards Oslo. Outside of the regional city, Asker will be without a clear urbanised character for longer than Bærum. Asker will have a lower utilisation of public transport services and a structure for which it is more difficult to provide a high-frequency bus service.

The consideration of land use and transport planning suggest that in Asker, as in Bærum, the focus should be on densification around the local train stations along the old double tracks and along the Spikkestad Line. In the longer term, larger areas under development at Hurumlandet can be served by a Spikkestad Line developed into a modern double-track line with higher frequencies, extended from Røyken.

In Asker and Bærum, high-frequency local buses to trains are prioritised over boats and buses directly to Oslo

The frequencies of local buses in Asker will be gradually increased, in part to ensure good correspondence with trains. The goal is a ten-minute schedule for a large part of the network. The resources for this will be freed by replacing direct bus lines to Oslo with feeder buses to trains, and by the boats to Vollen and Slemmestad being operated on a commercial basis with lower subsidies once good accessibility and travel speed for the bus has been secured on Slemmestadveien.

In Bærum also there will be a continuous reprioritisation of traffic, from buses to Oslo to local buses that correspond with the metro and train. The bus frequency in Bærum will gradually increase, with a goal of a frequency that corresponds to rail-based services, or alternatively departures every ten minutes.

Park and rides outside the regional cities

For some travel itineraries and purposes, park and rides will be an important part of a seamless journey. However, as the frequencies of the local buses increase and it is easier to walk or cycle, Asker residents will have a declining need for park and rides. At the same time, large parking areas and garages conflict with the development of Asker as an attractive regional city. Park and rides should therefore be relocated to a new station at Lierstranda and, for example, Billingstad.

Lysaker-Fornebu easily accessible for more people

A metro line to Fornebu and new local trains that also stop at Lysaker strengthens the hub further and makes the Lysaker-Fornebu area more easily accessible from much of the region.

Higher frequencies on the metro, tram and city bus

With a new metro tunnel, there will be space for increased frequencies on the Røa and Kolsås lines. The market potential may mean that it would be best to turn every other departure around at Bekkestua outside of rush hour. The Lilleaker Line must most likely terminate at Jar, but like the tram network overall this line will have departures every five minutes. The local city bus lines will be developed in the direction of ten-minute departures as a minimum standard. In the operational concept after the construction of the new tunnel, the Holmenkollen Line may get a somewhat higher frequency. If traffic developments in the metro tunnel leads to metro cars that are too full when short trains are used, alternative solutions must be considered.

Fornebu - where cycling is more common than driving and most people travel by metro

Bilde av Arena stasjon Fornebu
5.16 Illustration: Areana station, one of six new stations that will come with the Fornebu Line >Download original image

Characteristics of the area

With the metro forming the backbone, parts of Fornebulandet is transformed into a futuristic city with fantastic nature areas. With wise land use regulation, the area can have such a great concentration of workplaces that rush hour traffic reverses out of Oslo and Sandvika. Along with extensive cultural and sport offerings and a large number of residences, this provides a good basis for public transport. Furthermore, the flat terrain is perfect for cycling.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • New, modern, high-frequency metro serves the belt of workplaces
  • The area is perfect for cycling
Services in 2030/2040
  • The metro at Lysaker and three stations with short distances at Fornebu – with very high frequencies
  • Buses using renewable energy provide geographic coverage and feed to the metro
Cycling and walking
  • Bicycle sharing and a dense cycling path network make the car unnecessary. The terrain is flat, with short distances and park landscapes
Car and car sharing
  • Fornebu will have car-sharing solutions, and no park and ride is planned
  • There will still be local car traffic, but mainly outside of rush hour

Asker – everything nearby, regardless of what you need

5.17 Illustration: Asker has been identified as one of six regional cities in Akershus that is to absorb much of the population growth in the years ahead >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

Asker already has a successful urban development and is to a great extent a self-sufficient urban centre. In the period to 2030, urban development must continue and the area around the city centre must densify. Many people will thus have access to all necessary services within walking and cycling distance, but many will still depend on a good bus service or other motorised transport.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • High-frequency regional train with city bus network for geographic coverage
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Regional trains (10 min.)
  • Local trains (10 min.)
  • City bus network that covers the municipality and brings passengers to the city centre (10 min.)
  • Public transport absorbs a greater share of travel for leisure and personal business in the area
Cycling and walking
  • Cycling absorbs a greater share of travel for personal business and leisure in the area
  • Further expansion of the cycling and walking path network
Car and car sharing
  • In the centre of Asker, services will be sufficiently good that those who so wish can live without a car
  • A park and ride outside the centre of Asker makes it possible to use public transport for part of the journey for those who must use a car

Drammen – hub and source of inspiration through urban development and railway services

Bilde av Drammen
5.18 Illustration: Possible development towards Lierstranda outside of Drammen. Lierstranda Fjord City can provide space for up to 10,000 new residences and 20,000 workplaces >Download original image
Characteristics of the area

Drammen is the centre of Buskerud and the hub for surrounding towns. The city stands on its own feet, though some people work in Oslo and use the cultural offerings and services of the capital. Travel to the Oslo-area is mostly undertaken by rail.

The backbone of the mobility service
  • Trains and a bus network that has the railway as a hub
Services in 2030/2040 (departure frequencies in parenthesis)
  • Regional trains (15 min.) – Travel time to Oslo 30 min.
  • City bus network that is coordinated with the train
  • Ruter ticketing, fares and information systems
Cycling and walking
  • Further expansion of the cycling and walking path network, especially for the «river city» – a dense and public-transport friendly urban development
Car and car sharing
  • A park and ride makes it possible to use public transport for part of the journey for those who must use a car
  • A shared ticketing system makes it more attractive to use public transport for the entire journey
5.8

Basic service in sparsely populated areas

In large parts of the region, the purpose of public transport is tied to functionality and the environment while also safeguarding mobility. In rural areas, where there is a weak basis for public transport, parts of the increase in the demand for mobility may be met by environmentally friendly cars. Here Ruter defines a basic service that, depending on the market potential, consists of low-frequency, ordinary regional buses, school routes that can be used by anyone and/or transport-on-demand services.

It is desirable to a have a reasonable level of mobility in Ruter’s entire area without car use on distances and in situations where walking and cycling are unlikely. The minimum service is provided by school routes available to all, supplemented by transport-on-demand lines for purposes that cannot be adapted to the school routes. Transport-on-demand services should be better coordinated with paratransit services, with the goal of achieving cost reductions.

Hourly services should be a minimum for ordinary bus lines

If public transport services are to be attractive, rural areas must also have a certain frequency. Ordinary lines should therefore normally have a regular frequency of one departure an hour or more. For some areas with less traffic and great distances, a departure every other hour with extra departures during rush hour may be used. Services with lower frequencies than this, and that are not school buses, should only be offered if there is a significant market for them.

RuterFlex – the new transport-on-demand service

Areas without ordinary bus lines are served by transport-on-demand lines. Mobility services in the outer areas of Ruter’s market have a great potential to improve through more coordination of publicly paid transports and not least through a further development of a flexible transport-on-demand service. Based on the competencies in its subsidiary company Konsentra, Ruter wishes to further develop the flexible transport service RuterFlex. This may entail strengthening current transport-on-demand services, but may also involve new services with organised car-sharing services made possible through the development of new technology and information services.

Ruter Flex
5.19 Illustration: RuterFlex is a further development of transport-on-demand, where the goal is to give customers a simpler and more flexible journey.
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